The Florida Division of Emergency Management has designated February 22-26, 2016, as Severe Weather Awareness Week.

During this week the Division will collaborate with elementary schools to educate students about the types of severe weather that can occur in Florida. Activities will include a statewide tornado drill planned for Wednesday morning, February 24, at 10 am.

 

This is an excellent time for everyone to take a moment to learn and to be prepared.

Check out these great tips from Disaster One on what to do before, during, and after a hurricane.

NOAA’s Tornado Basics is an excellent source of information on a weather phenomenon that occurs in many parts of the world and can happen at any time of year.

 

Watches vs. Warnings: what do they mean?

 

 Tornado Watch vs. Warning 

  • A Tornado Watch is issued when there is a threat of large hail, damaging wind, and the possibility of multiple tornadoes.
  • A Tornado Warning is issued when a tornado (or sometimes a funnel cloud) has been spotted or is denoted by radar. When a tornado warning is issued for your area you should seek shelter immediately.

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Alerts

  • Tropical Storm Watch: An announcement that tropical-storm conditions are possible within the specified area.
  • Hurricane Watch: An announcement that hurricane conditions are possible within the specified area.

Because outside preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, watches are issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Action: During a watch, prepare your home and review your plan for evacuation in case a Hurricane or Tropical Storm Warning is issued. Listen closely to instructions from local officials.

  • Tropical Storm Warning: An announcement that tropical-storm conditions are expected within the specified area.
  • Hurricane Warning: An announcement that hurricane conditions are expected within the specified area. Because outside preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, warnings are issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Action: During a warning, complete storm preparations and immediately leave the threatened area if directed by local officials.

  • Extreme Wind Warning – Extreme sustained winds of a major hurricane (115 mph or greater), usually associated with the eyewall, are expected to begin within an hour.

Flash Flood Watch vs. Warning 

  • Flash Flood Watch A flash flood is possible within the designated watch areas.
  •  Flash Flood Warning:  A flash flood has been reported or is imminent.  Take necessary precaution immediately.

 

If you ever experience storm damage due to one of these weather events, Disaster One in Tampa is just a phone call or mouse click away. We provide storm damage restoration to the greater Tampa Bay area and we are on standby 24/7 for emergency response.

Call us at (877) 251-2798 or Request Service online at any time.